Thursday
Apr182019

Consortium Workshop Award 2018

The Fall 2018 Award winning proposal is for a workshop on Project-Based Language Teaching and Learning to be held at Yale University on October 25 - 26, 2019.

Proposed by:

Angela Lee-Smith (Yale Univ.)
Joowon Suh (Columbia Univ.)
Meejeong Song (Cornell Univ.)

 

Abstract

This workshop focuses on a pedagogical issue across languages: project-based learning (PBL). The keynote session will present informative and practical guidelines to help the participants explore the principles and benefits of PBL for language teaching and learning in higher education settings. Next, the workshop panel of lightning talks will showcase various projects that language colleagues designed, implementing a range of pedagogical approaches and purposes, and are currently using in their language classrooms. To highlight practical applications, the workshop will facilitate in-depth discussion and hands-on group work to enable participants to develop/refine their own projects, based on their interests and curriculum. Finally, the workshop will invite the participants to collaboratively contribute to build the online project repository through the consortium platform and share their projects with language teaching practitioners.

Rationale

Why PBL?

Project-Based Learning (PBL) is a student-centered, dynamic, active and authentic learning approach in which students gain a deeper understanding and greater range of language skills by working for an extended period of time to explore and complete authentic, engaging and complex tasks in an interconnected way (Levy, 1997; Moss & Van Duzer, 1998; Stoller, 2002, 2006; Fragoulis, Tsiplakides, & Tsiplakides, 2009; Thomas, 2017). 

PBL provides learners with a number of pedagogical benefits and involves a variety of approaches and methods, including Task-based, Communicative, Multiliteracies-based, Multimodal, Technology-based, Content-based, Standards-based, Geography/Place-based, Arts-based, and Community-based. Therefore, PBL has become a prominent language teaching approach at many levels and in various contexts (Beckett, 1999; Beckett & Miller, 2006; Fried-Booth, 2002; Kobayashi, 2003; Levis & Levis, 2003; Luongo Orlando, 2001; Mohan & Beckett, 2003; Weinstein, 2004). 

Overall, many studies show the benefits and efficacy of PBL. Positive outcomes include increases in level of student engagement and motivation (Thomas, 2000; Walker & Leary, 2009), heightened interest in content, more robust development of problem-solving strategies and critical thinking (Beckett&Miller,2006;Horan,Lavaroni,&Beldon,1996;Mergendoller,Maxwell,&Bellisimo,2006;Tretten&Zachariou,1995), and greater depth of learning and transfer of skills to new situations (Hmelo-Silver, 2007; Thomas, 2000; Barron, et al., 1998). In addition, students can become independent and able to apply their skills to real-world tasks (Finkelstein et al., 2010; Kirschner, 2006). Through PBL experiences, students also improve their ability to work collaboratively and resolve conflicts (Beckett & Miller, 2006; ChanLin, 2008). Integrating authentic projects in language classrooms may have practical challenges for teachers. However, projects can lead language programs and courses in a way that reduces such challenges and limitations in several respects, such as limitations of language textbooks and challenges of incorporating the World-readiness Standards Goals for Learning Language (5Cs) (Lee-Smith, 2017).

The way PBL intersects with teaching approaches can be clearly illustrated. Pedagogically, PBL can strengthen the following principles and practices in relation to different approaches:

• Content-based Approach: Content selection for curricular needs (e.g., arts, film, media, geography/places, history, politics, economic practices, literature, social issues)

• Task-based Approach: Authenticity; real-world tasks; project tasks

• Communicative Approach: Emphasis on learning to communicate through interaction with the target language

• Community-based Approach: The linking of classroom language and cultural learning with language use; interacting with real speakers of the target language and culture outside the classroom  

• Multiliteracies Practices: Creativity and Critical Thinking; multiple literacies; modes of meaning-making

• Learner-centered Approach: Active learning; fostering learner autonomy; the active involvement of the learners; real-world applications 

Furthermore, PBL can be easily implemented for the Standards-based language and culture curriculum across languages and levels in higher education settings. By working through projects, students have opportunities to develop well-rounded 5 C Standard goal areas – Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons and Communities (ACTFL 2015). At the center of language learning is Communication. Communicative competence cannot be fully achieved without gaining the knowledge and understanding of the Cultures. Knowledge of other languages and cultures affords individuals with Connections. Students are able to recognize that there are many ways to view the world through Comparisonsand contrasts between the target and native languages and cultures. Ultimately, studying another language provides the student with ways to establish multilingual Communities both locally and internationally. Thus, PBL can help learners meet the standards effectively with real-life tasks such as arts appreciation; engaging with communities; community-service learning; multiliteracies practices; building critical thinking and analytical skills through media and technology; and enhancing intercultural competence through meaningful communication. 

Program (Tentative)

Friday, October 25, 2019         

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.              

Workshop Opening 

Welcome by Nelleke Van Deusen-Scholl, Director of the Center for Language Study, Yale University

Keynote Presentation

Julio Rodriguez 

Director, National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC), University of Hawaii at Monoa 

5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.                Opening Reception 

Saturday, October 26, 2019

8:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.                Breakfast    

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.             Panel I - Lightning Talks: Project Showcase           

Telecollaboration-based project (Joowon Suh, Korean, Columbia University)

Place-based / Community-based project (Angela Lee-Smith, Korean, Yale University) 

Arts-based project (Angelina Craig-Florez, Spanish, Columbia University)

Q & A; Discussion 

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.          Break (Refreshments available) 

10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.          Panel II - Lightning Talks: Project Showcase

Content-based project (Meejeong Song, Korean, Cornell University) (William Zhou, Chinese, Yale University)

Projects for Heritage Language Learners (Sybil Alexandrov, Spanish, Yale University) 

Multiliteracies-based project (Christine Sagnier, French, Princeton University)

Projects to foster (inter)cultural competence (Candace Skorupa, French, Yale University)  

Q & A, Discussion 

12:15 p.m. – 12:45 p.m.         Ways to Assess Project Outcomes

Mary Jo Lubrano (Associate Director and Assessment Specialist, Yale Center for Language Study)

12:45 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.          Lunch

2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.           *Hands-on Break-out Session

                                             Discussion + Develop/refine Projects   

3:15 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.            Break (Refreshments available)

3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.           Final Presentations & Wrap-up Discussion: Projects in progress + Future project ideas and proposals  

* Note 1: There will be seven stations, one for each panelist and his/her respective topic. Participants can choose a station based on her/his interest.

Workshop Site

Reception/Keynote Presentation/Workshop: Yale Center for Language Study   Room 100

Keynote Speaker

Julio Rodriguez 

Director, National Foreign Language Resource Center (NFLRC), University of Hawaii at Monoa 

Panel Presenters

  •     Telecollaboration-based Project: Joowon Suh (Korean, Columbia University) 
  •     Place-based Project / Community-based Project:  Angela Lee-Smith (Korean, Yale University)
  •     Content-based Project: Meejeong Song (Korean, Cornell University) William Zhou (Chinese, Yale University) 
  •     Projects for Heritage Language Learners: Sybil Alexandrov (Spanish, Yale University)  
  •     Multiliteracies-based Project: Christine Sagnier (French, Princeton University) 
  •     Projects to Foster (Inter)cultural Competence: Candace Skorupa (French, Yale University)   
  •     Arts-based Project: Angelina Craig-Florez (Spanish, Columbia University)
  •     Assessment: Mary Jo Lubrano (Associate Director and Assessment Specialist, Yale Center for Language Study)
Monday
Mar042019

2019 Annual Consortium Symposium--Language Education in a Time of Crisis: Innovation, Adaptation, Transformation

This year's symposium will be held at Columbia University on May 10-11, 2019. For more information and to register, please visit the symposium website at http://languageconsortium.org/symposium-2019

Wednesday
Jan162019

Consortium Workshop Competition Announcement for AY 2018-2019

**Call for Consortium Workshop Proposals**
SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 19, 2019.

The Consortium for Language Teaching and Learning (CLTL) (http://www.languageconsortium.org/) is inviting proposals for a workshop on language pedagogy to be held during the Spring or Fall of 2020 on one of its member campuses. The CLTL offers funding of up to $5,000 to support the workshop. Additional funding may be available depending on the nature and scope of the proposal. Check with your campus representative before submitting a proposal.

The first workshop in this series was held at Brown University in October 2013 and was titled “Working at the Intersection of Language and Culture in the Digital Age: Practical Approaches to the Pedagogy of Cultural Learning”. The second, entitled “Language Learning and Teaching with Urban and Linguistic Landscapes”, was held at Columbia University in October 2016. The most recent workshop took place at Columbia University in October 2018 and the theme was “Working at the Intersection of Language and Culture in the Digital Age: Social Network Approaches (SNA) to the pedagogy of language teaching”.

Proposals must be submitted by a member of the language faculty of one of the member institutions (Brown, Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Princeton or Yale). 

The proposed workshop should be one or one-and-one-half days in length and either:

●     focus on a pedagogical issue across languages (for example, assessment; project-based learning; use of technology; heritage learning, etc.)

or

●     focus on a pedagogical issue pertaining to a specific language and involves faculty from two or more Consortium Institutions.

While both types of proposals are encouraged, preference will be given to proposals that actively involve language faculty from multiple institutions, target multiple languages, or reflect ongoing or proposed collaborative activities across two or more institutions.Since these events are envisioned as faculty workshops, there is an expectation of active involvement or hands-on work by the participants. The funding is not intended for lectures or symposia, although a workshop might feature an invited speaker to provide the broader theoretical context for the event

CLTL funding can be used to:

●      cover costs to host a speaker and/or multiple presenters (including travel and lodging)

●      pay for materials

●      defray costs of refreshments, meals and room rental

Your proposal should:

●     be three to five pages long, double spaced (proposals that exceed the required length will not be considered)

●     provide a detailed and convincing rationale that identifies the topic and its relevance to current pedagogical and theoretical issues

●     include a detailed schedule for the workshop, including proposed speakers and topics

●     have a significant hands-on focus, allowing participants to actively engage with the topic

●     include a brief bio of each of the organizers

●      include a detailed budget and - when possible - bios of the proposed presenters (these are not part of the 3-5-page requirement)

Should you be awarded the funding, you must:

●     plan and carry out all aspects of the workshop

●     keep track of all expenses to be reimbursed, and submit your receipts to the Consortium

●     write a short report summarizing the workshop

●     carry out an evaluation of the workshop and attach completed evaluations to your report

●     post this report or any papers or talks from the workshop on the CLTL webpage

Each campus can submit up to 3 proposals. Interested candidates are urged to consult with their campus CLTL representatives before and during the writing process.

The CLTL board will select one proposal to fund from the pool of proposals submitted. Deadline for submission of proposals is April 19, 2019. Please submit your proposal to the Consortium representative on your campus:

Brown University: Jane Sokolosky (Jane_Sokolosky@Brown.edu)

Columbia University: Stéphane Charitos (sc758@columbia.edu)

Cornell University: Angelika Kraemer (akraemer@cornell.edu)

Princeton University: James Rankin (jrankin@princeton.edu)

University of Chicago: Cathy Baumann (ccbauman@uchicago.edu)

Yale University: Nelleke Van Deusen-Scholl (nelleke.vandeusen-scholl@yale.edu)

 

Tuesday
Sep262017

Consortium Workshop Award 2017

This year’s winning proposal for a workshop funded by the Consortium for Language Teaching and Learning is titled “Working at the Intersection of Language and Culture in the Digital Age: Social Network Approaches (SNA) to the pedagogy of language teaching” and was submitted by Fumiko Nazikian, senior lecturer in Japanese language and Jisuk Park, lecturer in Japanese language, at Columbia University, New York. 

The proposal outlined the pedagogical rationale on which SNA is grounded and put forward an argument in support of its instructional uses, particularly in light of the frameworks of global communities within which students operate, and the intercultural component of their engagement with global issues.

The workshop has been awarded $5,000 and will take place at Columbia University during Fall 2018. In addition to workshop sessions that will allow instructors of all languages to discuss the incorporation of SNA, the workshop will include a keynote address by Prof. Tohsaku of the University of California, San Diego.

Wednesday
Dec142016

Call for Consortium Workshop Proposal

The Consortium for Language Teaching and Learning (http://www.languageconsortium.org/) is inviting proposals for a workshop on language pedagogy to be held in the spring or fall semester 2018, on one of its member campuses. The CLTL offers funding of up to $5000 to support the workshop. Additional funding may be available depending on the nature and scope of the proposal. Check with your campus representative before submitting a proposal.

The first workshop in this series was held at Brown University in October 2013 and was titled “Working at the Intersection of Language and Culture in the Digital Age: Practical Approaches to the Pedagogy of Cultural Learning”. The second, entitled “Language Learning and Teaching with Urban and Linguistic Landscapes”, was held at Columbia University in October 2016.

Proposals must be submitted by a member of the language faculty of one of the member institutions (Brown, Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, or Yale). The proposed workshop should be one or one-and-one-half days in length and either:

  • focus on a pedagogical issue across languages (for example, assessment; project-based learning; use of technology; heritage learning, etc.
  • or focus on a pedagogical issue pertaining to a specific language and involves faculty from two or more Consortium Institutions.

While both types of proposals are encouraged, preference will be given to proposals that actively involve language faculty from multiple institutions, target multiple languages, or reflect ongoing or proposed collaborative activities across two or more institutions.

CLTL funding can be used to:

  • cover costs to host a speaker and/or multiple presenters (including travel and lodging)
  • pay for materials
  • defray costs of refreshments, meals and room rental

Your proposal should:

  • be three to five pages long, double spaced (Proposals that exceed the required length will not be considered)
  • provide a detailed and convincing rationale that identifies the topic and its relevance to current pedagogical and theoretical issues
  • include a detailed schedule for the workshop, including proposed speakers and topics
  • have a significant hands-on focus, allowing participants to actively engage with the topic
  • include a brief bio of each of the organizers
  • include a detailed budget and - when possible - bios of the proposed presenters (these are not part the 3-5 page requirement)

Should you be awarded the funding, you must:

  • plan and carry out all aspects of the workshop
  • keep track of all expenses to be reimbursed, and submit your receipts to the Consortium
  • write a short report summarizing the workshop
  • carry out an evaluation of the workshop and attach completed evaluations to your report
  • post this report or any papers or talks from the workshop on the CLTL webpage

Each campus can submit up to 3 proposals. Interested candidates are urged to consult with their campus CLTL representatives before and during the writing process.

The CLTL board will select one proposal to fund from the pool of proposals submitted. Deadline for submission of proposals is February 28, 2017. Please submit your proposal to the Consortium representative on your campus:

Brown University: Elsa Amanatidou (elsa_amanatidou@brown.edu)
Columbia University: Stéphane Charitos (sc758@columbia.edu)
Cornell University: Dick Feldman (rf10@cornell.edu)
University of Chicago: Cathy Baumann (ccbauman@uchicago.edu)
Yale University: Nelleke Van Deusen-Scholl (nelleke.vandeusen-scholl@yale.edu)